Treatment of Diaphyseal Tibial Fractures of Cats with Using Minimal Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis and Evaluation of Outcomes Postoperatively

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Authors

  • Birkan Karslı
  • Merve Bakıcı

Keywords:

Cat, fracture, plate osteosynthesis, tibia

Abstract

In the present study, it was aimed to apply minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) in the treatment of diaphyseal tibia fractures in cats and to evaluate recovery and complications postoperatively. Minimally invasive fracture repair preserves the blood supply of fragments and periosteal tissues which help to result faster healing, less morbidity, and rapid recovery of limb function. The study was conducted on 12 cats with diaphyseal tibia fracture. After closed reduction of the fractures of the cats included in the study, two small incisions were made from the proximal and distal tibia to expose the bone tissue. Plate placement was performed percutaneously through these insicion areas. The plate was fixed with two screws from the proximal and distal incision line and the fixation of the fracture line was ensured. Soft bandage was applied for 5 days postoperatively and animals caged to restrict movements for 3 weeks. X-rays were taken at regular intervals postoperatively and fracture healing was evaluated. In the controls, it was seen that the animals started to use their legs after the bandage was removed. There were no complications related to the very small operation wound and bone tissue. Healing times were determined as 35 days on average. As a result, it was determined that earlier healing was performed and less complication rate compared to open operational techniques.

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Published

2024-03-25

How to Cite

Karslı, B., & Bakıcı, M. (2024). Treatment of Diaphyseal Tibial Fractures of Cats with Using Minimal Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis and Evaluation of Outcomes Postoperatively. International Journal of Veterinary and Animal Research (IJVAR), 7(1), 20–23. Retrieved from https://ijvar.org/index.php/ijvar/article/view/601

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Research Articles